WV Center on Budget and Policy > Publications > Family Economic Security > Children and Families > Restoring Budget Cuts Will Help More Children and Families

Restoring Budget Cuts Will Help More Children and Families

April 25, 2014 by

2014 Budget Cuts reort coverOn March 23, Governor Tomblin used his line-item veto power to cut several early childhood and domestic violence programs from the FY2015 budget passed by the legislature. This included over $1 million in cuts to In-Home Family Education, Family Resource Networks and Starting Points Family Resource Centers, Child Advocacy Centers, domestic violence programs and services, and child abuse prevention. Many of these programs have seen cuts in prior years or have not had any funding increases for years, while the cost of services and the increase in the number of families needing assistance has continued to rise, making it impossible to serve as many families and children. Read PDF of report

The good news is that it is not too late to restore these cuts. Governor Tomblin has indicated he plans to call a Special Legislative Session on May 19 and that a supplemental appropriations bill to restore these cuts could be part of that agenda.

This report looks at the important family support programs that were cut, the important communities they serve, the money they leverage, and the strong support they have in West Virginia. Read PDF of report.

Key Findings:

  • From preventing child abuse to giving parents the tools they need to raise healthy children, these programs are a vital piece in making the state’s communities strong and safe.
  • Altogether, these programs leverage over $14 million in federal and private funds. 
  • These programs are not only efficient, but they are a sound investment. For example, every $1 invested in In-Home Family Education programs returns $5.70 to the community. 
  • These cuts will hurt families and kill jobs. The cuts to In-Home Family Education could mean 75 fewer families receiving vital services to help their children, while at least 560 victims of domestic violence will not receive services. Cuts to domestic violence grants also mean that between seven and 14 people will lose their jobs. 
  • These programs have tremendous support, including the faith community, child-policy experts, and among both Democrats and Republicans.