WV Center on Budget and Policy > Blog > Budget Beat > Affordable Care Act Repeal Threatens Health Coverage and Economic Hardship in West Virginia

Affordable Care Act Repeal Threatens Health Coverage and Economic Hardship in West Virginia

A new West Virginia Center on Budget and Policy report shows the far-reaching effects of an ACA repeal in the Mountain State. Read.

The report shows West Virginia will be one of the most heavily impacted states by an ACA repeal. West Virginia will lose an estimated $349 million over five years in state and local taxes as a result of reduced economic activity generated by the ACA and the state’s budget crisis could worsen if ACA provisions that provide direct savings to the state are repealed among other negative impacts.

The WVCBP believes Congress and the President should build on the progress that has been made through the ACA. Any actions taken should carefully consider the impact they have on the number of uninsured and on health-care costs.

This WVCBP blog takes a look at a potential approach — the Patient Freedom Act of 2017 — to replace the Affordable Care Act. Read.

Based on what is known, the proposal shifts major decisions about how to respond to a repeal of the Affordable Care Act. At the same time, states will have less federal dollars to help subsidize the cost of health insurance and preserve gains made under the ACA.

Ultimately, the proposal leaves a variety of important questions unanswered.

In the News
This Bluefield Daily Telegraph story takes us to the nation’s capital city where U.S. Rep. Evan Jenkins (R-W.Va.) is fighting for more support to help out-of-work coal miners. Read.

The bill — Assisting America’s Dislocated Miners Act — if successful would establish the Dislocated Miners Assistance Program under the U.S. Department of Labor. The move would also provide $20 million per-year over five years to fund the program.

The WVCBP welcomes the effort by Congressman Jenkins and believes it could help diversify West Virginia’s economy.



Governor Jim Justice told a group of lawmakers and business owners the state’s budget gap is expected to reach $700 million in FY 2019. Read.

Justice went on to tell the Register-Herald that many of the “low-hanging fruit” have already been taken and further dips into the state’s Rainy Day Fund would be disastrous for the state’s bond rating.

The WVCBP looks forward to the new administration working with legislators to come up with real budget solutions that do not negatively impact West Virginians and the vital services they use daily.


Upcoming Events

Register for the WVCBP’s upcoming Budget Breakfast by Tuesday, January 31 to enjoy an early bird discount rate. The event slated for Feb. 23 will feature remarks by the Governor’s Chief of Staff Nick Casey and Senator Mike Hall. Register here.


Protect West Virginia will host a Budget Boot Camp on Wednesday, February 1, 2017 at the Girl Scout Black Diamond Council building in Charleston.

Citizens are welcomed to join Protect West Virginia, Our Children Our Future, West Virginia Development Hub, and others to discuss the state’s on-going budget woes, how it impacts their daily lives, and how to take action from there to Protect West Virginia. More info on the event may be found here.


What We Are Reading…

– If you don’t think progressives and conservatives can find ways to work together to reduce income inequality, check out these eight market-oriented policy proposals that our friend Dean Baker published for the conservative American Enterprise Institute.

– And if you don’t think there is hope for Appalachia in the Trump-era, think again says former coal-miner Nick Mullins in this piece from the Huffington Post.

– If you are interested in economics and are looking for a place to study, discover, participate, and orient yourself in pluralist economics go to this new interactive website called Exploring Economics. Listen to Mariana Mazzucato give a Ted Talk about how government plays an important and large role as an investor and innovator.

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