Tax Reform For Working Families Could Improve West Virginia’s Chronic Poverty Rate

Too many West Virginians struggled to make ends meet in 2015, and the number of West Virginians living in poverty remained unchanged. One solution? A Working Families Tax Credit that would help people who work for low wages keep more of what they earn.

How could a West Virginia Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) help your community by boosting the economy and helping workers stay on the job? Find out here.

This week’s Clarksburg Exponent-Telegram further explains how West Virginia can improve its ranking, currently the 7th highest rate of poverty in the nation.

Lawmakers Urged to Raise Revenues

This week the Charleston Gazette urged legislators to raise revenues to help fill next year’s projected budget gap. Suggestions included raising the tobacco tax further, and increasing the tax on soft drinks and alcohol, among other ideas.

If not, we could face more cuts like these:

Comment Period Ending Soon – Have You Signed Yet?

Click here to add your voice to the tens of thousands of people from across the country who are calling for a strong payday lending rule from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. While payday lending is illegal in West Virginia, a weak payday lending rule could erode our protections.

Help Us Get to 1,400 Likes!

Do you follow us on Facebook? Please go here to like our page and stay in touch with us during the week!

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Hearts, Minds and Futures

Tuesday, October 4 in Wheeling!

New Data: Thanks to Health Care Reform, More of Us Have Health Insurance

More and more West Virginians have health insurance, thanks to the Affordable Care Act and Medicaid Expansion.

According the U.S. Census Bureau, 108,000 West Virginians lacked health insurance in 2015, a decrease of 48,000 from 2014. With 94.0 percent of West Virginians now having health insurance, the state’s uninsured rate in 2015 was 6.0 percent, down from 8.6 percent in 2014, and 14.0 percent in 2013, before the Affordable Care Act was fully implemented.

Here’s more in the Charleston Gazette-Mail and the Huntington Herald-Dispatch.

This week’s Census Bureau numbers weren’t all good news, though, showing that the state’s poverty rate didn’t budge. With the 7th highest poverty rate in the nation, West Virginia continues to struggle to recover from the Great Recession. Nearly one in four of us still lives in poverty. And African American’s in West Virginia have it much worse with over one in four people struggling at or below the poverty line.

Decline in WV Coal-Mining Jobs Explained

This perspective in the Wall Street Journal this week, which mentions our research, discusses how coal-mining employment has been on the decline for decades, with much thanks to machines taking over the work that miners used to do.

What can policymakers do to help coalfield communities? The Reclaim Act, which would bring much-needed financial assistance and retraining, is currently stalled in Congress. The bill has bipartisan support and 27 resolutions have been passed by Appalachian communities calling for Congress to act. Here’s more from the Union of Concerned Scientists.

Have You Signed Yet? Add Your Voice to Keep Payday Lending Out of West Virginia!

Click here to add your voice to the tens of thousands of people from across the country who are calling for a strong payday lending rule from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.

Hearts, Minds and Futures

This Monday in Charleston!

They Did It, We Can Too: Lessons from Montana

Speakers: John Engen, Mayor of Missoula, Montana

Steve Spratt, Manager of Florida Governmental Utility Authority

Rising water rates, lack of infrastructure investment and water quality problems led communities in Florida and Montana to replace failing private water systems with locally owned, public water systems. Hear about their experiences!

For more information, email Cathy Kunkel.

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West Virginia’s Budget Crisis Affects Us All

It took a special session but lawmakers successfully balanced this year’s budget as the clock was running out. A mixture of Rainy Day funds, budget cuts, and an increase in the tobacco tax filled the gap. They did not, however, provide a long-term solution and West Virginia will face a similar situation next year.

How did we get here? What are the solutions? WVCBP staff is hitting the road to talk about this issue that is important to us all.

If you are interested in hosting a presentation, please email us. Perhaps you are a member of a civic organization, a nonprofit group or a club. We will come to your meeting a give a budget talk tailored to your agenda.

Want a preview? Here’s Ted Boettner’s presentation he made at West Virginia University this week.

Here’s more in the Morgantown Dominion Post and on WBOY-TV.

Contact us for more information. Visit our Events page for future presentations.

Lead Sponsor Explains Why a WV EITC is Important

This week Delegate Matthew Rohrbach (R-Cabell) explained via an op-ed in the Charleston Gazette-Mail why it’s so important that West Virginia lawmakers pass a bill to bring a state Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) to West Virginia.

Here’s an excerpt:

“As a physician, evidence always guides the decisions I make with respect to my patients’ care. I keep the same principles in mind as a state legislator, and evidence shows that a West Virginia EITC is a win-win for the state.

“We already know the federal EITC provides a tax credit to working families, helping them afford basic necessities that make it more likely their kids will thrive and that they can afford things that make it possible to hold down a job, like reliable transportation. A West Virginia EITC would provide an additional lift for those same families.”

Read the entire op-ed here.

Find out how much a state EITC would boost your local economy here.

Welcome, Luke!

We are happy to welcome Luke Yingling as our fall intern! Luke is a Senior political science and history student at the University of Charleston. He currently assists Huntington’s Office of Drug Control Policy with policy advocacy campaigns. He has held a number of internships in the past with non-profit organizations, working primarily on community needs research.

Luke’s project while he is with us will be to publish his research on the state’s drug court system.

Hearts, Minds and Futures – This Monday in Huntington!

They Did It, We Can Too: Lessons from other public water fights

Thursday, September 22nd
7:00-8:30pm
University of Charleston Appalachian Room (in the Geary Student Union)
RSVP: www.ourwaterwv.org/events

The movement for a public water system in the Kanawha Valley is growing due to frustration with WV American Water’s high rates, frequent main breaks and poor service. Save the date for a public forum on what it could look like to create a public water system for the Kanawha Valley.

In 2013, Florida residents took public control of a failing private water system owned by Aqua Florida. Join us to learn more about how this happened and what citizens can do to create a public water system that is transparent, accountable and fair. For more information, email Cathy Kunkel.

Keep Payday Lending Out of West Virginia

payday lending theatre marquis

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) has proposed rules that, if strengthened, could rein in the worst abuses of payday and car title lending. Thankfully, West Virginia protects against abusive payday and car title loans, but the CFPB still needs to hear from you.

Add your voice now to stop the debt trap!

Payday loans notoriously carry 300+% APR (annual percentage rate). Strategically located in low-income neighborhoods, payday lenders intentionally trap borrowers in debt that they cannot escape. The average payday borrower is trapped by ten transactions in a year.

Though payday lenders are not allowed in our state, we still need a strong national rule. Payday lenders will use a weak rule to seek a green light to come back into West Virginia.

Support a strong rule to stop these predatory practices.

Thank you so much for acting today.

What Do Cuts to Higher Ed Mean to You?

Join Us in the WVU Mountainlair – In Person or Streaming!

Balancing the state budget has meant year after year of cuts to higher education funding in West Virginia. Public colleges and universities have been forced to respond with tuition hikes while the state’s Promise scholarship has remained flat, putting college affordability out of reach for some West Virginia families.

Want to find out more about how the state budget works, how we got into our current crisis and how we can get out?

On Tuesday, September 6, WVCBP Executive Director Ted Boettner will kick-off our speaker series at the West Virginia University Campus at 2:00 PM at the Mountainlair.

Can’t be there in person? Join us here.

Contact us for more information. Visit our Events page for future presentations. Thanks!

Facts About Year One of Prevailing Wage Repeal

A big priority of the legislature last year was to repeal the state’s prevailing wage. Promises were made of cost savings and job creation. In fact, West Virginia lost 1,000 construction jobs in the past year (see data below from the Bureau of Labor Statistics). Read more in this week’s State Journal op-ed by Senior Policy Analyst Sean O’Leary.


Hearts, Minds and Futures

The WVCBP is proud to join organizations from across West Virginia to sponsor six forums on juvenile justice, mental health and education in the Mountain State. For more information, please contact info@wvmh4kids.org or 304-444-5917.

  • Huntington: Tuesday, September 13, 5:00 to 7:00 PM in the Memorial Student Center at Marshall University
  • Charleston: Monday, September 19, 5:30 to 7:30 PM in the Appalachian Room at the University of Charleston
  • Beckley: Wednesday, September 28, 5:30 to 7:30 PM at WVU-Beckley
  • Wheeling: Tuesday, October 4, 5:30 to 7:30 PM in the NTTC Auditorium at Wheeling Jesuit University
  • Morgantown: Friday, October 7, 5:30 to 7:30 PM in the Rhododendron Room, Mountainlair at WVU
  • Martinsburg: Tuesday, October 25, 5:30 to 7:30 PM in the HSC Auditorium at WVU-Martinsburg

Why is juvenile justice such an important issue? While most states have reduced the number of their youth in confinement, West Virginia’s confinement rate has grown by more than 50%. It’s time to look at cost-saving alternatives that would save the state money while still protecting public safety.

View full PDF here.

Have You Taken This Quick Action to Keep Payday Loans Out of West Virginia?

Take this quick action to add your voice now to stop the debt trap – please add a personal note if payday lending has affected you or someone you know!

Though payday lenders are not allowed in our state, they will use a weak rule to come back into West Virginia.

Support a strong rule to stop these predatory practices.

Want to know more about how much better off West Virginia is without payday lending? Check out this report by the Center for Responsible Lending. Every year, residents in states that ban payday lending save over $2 billion in fees. West Virginia alone saves over $48 million annually!

It’s Time for a Tax Cut for Working Families

Families who struggle to pay for expenses put most of their money right back into the economy when they buy necessities. A West Virginia Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) would give these families an additional boost at tax time and generate millions of dollars in local West Virginia communities.

This week the Charleston Gazette editorial page endorsed this important policy already in effect in 26 other states. You can learn more about how it would impact your local legislative district at www.investinwvfamilies.org.

Read more in this piece by State EITC Campaign Coordinator Seth DiStefano.


Please Add Your Voice Today to Keep Payday Loans Out of West Virginia

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) has proposed rules that, if strengthened, could rein in the worst abuses of payday and car title lending. Thankfully, West Virginia protects against abusive payday and car title loans, but the CFPB still needs to hear from you.

Take this quick action to add your voice now to stop the debt trap – please add a personal note if payday lending has affected you or someone you know!

Payday loans notoriously carry 300+% APR (annual percentage rate). Strategically located in low-income neighborhoods, payday lenders intentionally trap borrowers in debt that they cannot escape. The average payday borrower is trapped by ten transactions in a year.

Though payday lenders are not allowed in our state, we still need a strong national rule. Payday lenders will use a weak rule to seek a green light to come back into West Virginia.

Support a strong rule to stop these predatory practices.

Want to know more about how much better off West Virginia is without payday lending? Check out this new report by the Center for Responsible Lending. Every year, residents in states that ban payday lending save over $2 billion in fees. West Virginia alone saves over $48 million annually!

What Does West Virginia’s Budget Crisis Mean to You?

This fall, WVCBP staff will travel across the state to talk to people about what the ongoing budget crisis means in people’s every-day lives.

Next month, Executive Director Ted Boettner will kick-off our speaker series at the West Virginia University Campus on Tuesday, September 6 at 2:00 PM at the Mountainlair.

Contact us for more information. Visit our Events page for future presentations. Thanks!

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WVCBP Board President Joins National Health Impact Project

Renate Pore, WVCBP board president, has been invited to join a community advisory panel to provide guidance and strategic input to projects and investments in southern and Appalachian states. Renate was selected as a community-based leader with expertise in, and a commitment to, advancing health equity in the region.

The Health Impact Project, a collaboration of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and The Pew Charitable Trusts, is a national initiative designed to promote the use of health impact assessments (HIAs) as a decision-making tool for policymakers.

Congratulations, Renate!

Happy Women’s Equality Day!

Today, we mark nearly a century of celebrating the 19th amendment, granting women the right to vote. We should never let go of that legacy, we should never become complacent with that hard-won gift.

Today, we celebrate this right, but in November, please do not forget to exercise it. My five-year-old daughter, Tova, notices everything, and has gone with me to vote in municipal, state, and national elections. She knows that when the polls are open we go vote with Mommy. It is my job to teach her this practice as a good citizen, and the history, because unless we teach them, they will assume women could always vote.

We should always teach our daughters, and sons, about the fight and the victory, but most importantly about exercising the right to walk into a voting booth and make change as a citizen.

Honor those who fought for this right by making sure you are registered to participate in the November election. Register online here.

#RememberInNovember

~ Tara Martinez, WVCBP Policy Outreach Coordinator

Tova Martinez Walking the Halls of Her Capitol

Is It Time to Modernize West Virginia’s Marijuana Laws?

Decriminalizing marijuana could save West Virginia millions of dollars in its corrections budget and legalizing medical marijuana could provide an alternative to highly addictive opioid painkillers. These are among the findings of Modernizing West Virginia’s Marijuana Laws: Potential Benefits of Decriminalization, Medical Marijuana and Legalization, a report released yesterday and written by Tara Holmes, WVCBP Summer Research Associate.

As of 2016, four states and the District of Columbia have legalized the recreational use of marijuana for adults, 25 states (and DC) allow for marijuana to be used for medical purposes, and 21 states have decriminalized possession of small amounts of marijuana.

With several states considering ballot measures this November and public support for legalization rapidly growing (53% of Americans support legalization) among all age groups, the number of states taking action to undo restrictions on marijuana is likely to grow. While most states have taken at least one step toward modernizing their marijuana laws, West Virginia has not. However, bi-partisan legislation has been introduced in West Virginia over the last several years to legalize medical marijuana and tax marijuana for retail sales to adults. A 2013 poll found that a majority of West Virginians supports decriminalizing marijuana and legalizing it for medical use, while 46 percent supported regulating it like alcohol.

Read more in this week’s Charleston Gazette-Mail and the State Journal.

 

Candidate Forum – Thursday, August 25

In anticipation of the November general election, area organizations will host a non-partisan candidate forum on Thursday, August 25 at 6:00 PM at the WV Culture Center. The event will be moderated by Ashton Marra of West Virginia Public Broadcasting and is free and open to the public.

All candidates running for House of Delegates in Districts 35 and 36 and Senate Districts 8 and 17 have been invited. Confirmed to date are:

* Chris Walters – Senate District 8
* Glenn Jeffries – Senate District 8
* Corey Palumbo – Senate District 17
* Thornton Cooper – House of Delegates District 35
* Benjamin Adams – House of Delegates District 35
* Chelsea Walker-Gaskins – House of Delegates District 35
* Nancy Guthrie – House of Delegates District 36
* Andrew Robinson – House of Delegates District 36
* Larry Rowe – House of Delegates District 36

This forum is hosted by: ACLU of West Virginia, West Virginia Citizen Action Group, WV FREE, Fairness West Virginia, WV Center for Budget and Policy, Planned Parenthood South Atlantic, West Virginia Coalition Against Domestic Violence, Compassion WV, Our Children Our Future, Inspire WV, and the NAACP of Charleston.

For more information, please contact Julie Warden at 304.342.9188 or Julie@wvfree.org.

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Higher Education Cuts Jeopardize Students’ and States’ Economic Future

Public colleges and universities have experienced major cuts in state funding since the Great Recession hit – something West Virginia lawmakers should consider as they grapple with difficult budget decisions in coming months.

Funding cuts have often been accompanied by tuition hikes and cuts in campus staff and programs that may reduce the quality of education for students. Per student funding at West Virginia’s public colleges and universities is 24% below 2008 levels which has lead to an sharp increase in tuition.

For more information, read Funding Down, Tuition Up, released by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities this week.


New Report Shows Racial Disparities Harming Young Children in West Virginia

This week West Virginia Kids Count released its report, Real Talk on Race, which found that in eight key measures, African-American kids fair more poorly than their white counterparts. For instance, nearly six in ten (57%) of African-American kids under five live in poverty, while about one in four (27%) white children under five is poor.

WV Kids Count’s “Race2Great” project is a five-year effort to implement four key policies that could make West Virginia a top 20 place to be a kid in the next 10 years. They include a West Virginia Earned Income Tax Credit for working families; high-quality pre-school for all three-year-olds; an additional increase in the tobacco tax to reduce pregnancy smoking and low birth-weight babies; and statewide implementation of the state’s health and sex education curriculum to reduce teen pregnancies.

How a Tax on Soda Could Help WV’s Fiscal and Physical Health

Lunch and Learn About the Benefits of a Soda Tax This Wednesday, August 17

How could a soda tax improve our physical and fiscal health in West Virginia?

Numerous studies have linked the excessive consumption of soda to the nation’s epidemic of obesity, diabetes and other diseases. A soda tax could reduce consumption and positively impact public health. It would bring new revenues to West Virginia to fund health promotion efforts, public health insurance programs or other programs. West Virginia’s existing soda tax is seen as too small to curb consumption and its revenue is not earmarked for public health insurance programs.

Join the discussion this Wednesday, August 17 from 11:30 AM – 1:00 PM at the WV Covenant House. Bring your own lunch and healthy beverage!

Cola drink splash with ice cube on white background

Lessons from Other Public Water Fights

The movement for a public water system in the Kanawha Valley is growing due to frustration with WV American Water’s high rates, frequent main breaks and poor service. Save the date for a public forum on what it could look like to create a public water system for the Kanawha Valley.

In 2013, Florida residents took public control of a failing private water system owned by Aqua Florida. Join us to learn more about how this happened and what we can do to create a public water system that is transparent, accountable and fair.

Thursday, September 22nd, 7:00-8:30 PM
University of Charleston Appalachian Room (in the Geary Student Union)
RSVP: www.ourwaterwv.org/events 

Community Development Investments: Foundations for Growth

Please join the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland and the Federal Home Loan Bank of Pittsburgh for a symposium on community development investments. This event will feature experts and practitioners who will discuss ways to build organizational capacity and expand opportunities to secure community development finance and bank financing. They will also provide examples of successful community development projects.

This program is designed for nonprofit and affordable housing providers, social service agencies, state and local municipal officials, foundations and financial institutions.

September 14, 2016, 10:15 AM – 2:45 PM, lunch provided. Registration opens at 9:45 AM.

Location: Troy Theater, Swint Hall, Wheeling Jesuit University, 316 Washington Ave, Wheeling, WV.

Register here. For questions, please contact Joseph Ott at (412) 261-7947.

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Join the West Virginians for Affordable Health Care Team

West Virginians for Affordable Health Care is seeking a highly motivated and detail-oriented Health Policy Coordinator to support West Virginians for Affordable Health Care’s ongoing advocacy efforts to improve West Virginia’s health, and education policies. The Health Policy Coordinator is responsible for public education, outreach and advocacy on the Affordable Care Act, Medicaid, the Children’s Health Insurance Program and other public policies that impact access, quality and affordability of health care in West Virginia. This position will be located in Charleston, WV.

Attributes: possess a strong work ethic, pride in work, the skills and confidence to take initiative, accept direction and work cooperatively.

Be an energetic “people” person who gets along well with all kinds of people, handle and prioritize multiple responsibilities; a self-starter and finisher.

Excellent organizational, writing and social skills.

Qualifications: Law degree, PhD, or Master’s Degree in public health, social work, public administration or other relevant field desired. Bachelor’s degree required.

Computer and social media literate. Working knowledge of MS Word, PowerPoint and Excel.

Experience in writing grants.

To apply or get more information, contact Terri Giles.

wvahc

Happy Friday from the WVCBP Family!

Lucy Boettner, Liam O’Leary, Maddie O’Leary and Sid Boettner – August 9, 2016

Two Great Events This Week in Buckhannon and Martinsburg!

Join Us for the First Evening of the 2016 Summer Policy Institute

The Inaugural 2016 Summer Policy Institute (SPI) will be held July 29-31, 2016 at West Virginia Wesleyan College in Buckhannon.

Students from across West Virginia will be a part of this first-ever event.

The first evening of 2016 Summer Policy Institute is free and open to the public! Plan to join us on July 29 at the Virginia Thomas Center for the Performing Arts!

6:30PM: Panel discussion – Moving to an Intervention and Prevention Model for Better Youth Outcomes. Panelists include Stephanie Bond with the Division of Juvenile Services; Eli Baumwell with the WV chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union; Kathy Szafran, President and CEO of Crittenton Services; Cindy Largent-Hill with the WV Supreme Court; Trudi Blaylock with PSI-Med; and Jason Nicholas with the WV Public Defenders’ office (invited: WV DHHR). The panel will be moderated by Circuit Court Judge Joanna Tabit. The panel will discuss how West Virginia can move more toward an intervention and prevention model instead of an institutional model when dealing with adverse youth experiences.

9:00PM: Screening of the film Paper Tigers, an intimate look into the lives of selected students at Lincoln High School, an alternative school that specializes in educating traumatized youth. Set amidst the rural community of Walla Walla, WV, the film intimately examines the inspiring promise of Trauma Informed Communities, a movement that is showing great promise in healing youth struggling with the dark legacy of Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACES).

Email info@wvpolicy.org for more information!


The Racial Wealth Divide

Please join Martinsburg Renew and Friends for a friendly, peaceful and open discussion on racial inequality in West Virginia, what it is, why it matters, and what we can do about it.

St. Joseph’s Catholic Church, Lackey Hall
July 28 2016, 6:00 to 8:30 p.m.
225 S. Queen Street, Martinsburg, WV

Contact Debbie at 540-535-5145, or DeborahMM@aol.com to register.

Free and open to ALL – Let’s start the discussion. Come, Learn, Understand, Share, Unite

Legalized Marijuana and the WV Budget

At this week’s Lunch and Learn, Tara Holmes, our Summer Research Associate, presented the potential benefits to West Virginia if marijuana were to be legalized for medicinal and recreational use in the state.

Her research shows that legalizing marijuana for recreational use would bring in between $26 and $45 million a year in tax revenue from West Virginia residents alone. That number grows to $116 to $194 million when out-of-state visitors are included. Read Tara’s presentation.

Special thanks goes out to the West Virginia Covenant House for hosting the Lunch and Learn program, taking place the second Wednesday of every month.

marijuana infographic

 

Report Card: How Are States Dealing with Marcellus Shale Drilling?

The Multi-State Shale Research Collaborative has released its report card that evaluates the current policies of Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia in a range of policy areas. It compares policies across the three states that address the social and economic issues that unconventional drilling delivers to the communities in which it occurs. Read full report.

This scorecard informs policy-makers about the strengths and weaknesses of their respective policies. The three states can enhance their overall prosperity, and that of shale gas communities, by improving their grades – adopting policies that better mitigate the unanticipated negative impacts of unconventional gas drilling and that take better advantage of new economic activity and revenue generated by natural gas extraction.


Free Hug Friday

The weeks ending June and beginning in July have taken a toll on my heart, my spirit. From the onset of fiscal disarray in our state government to raging storms leaving my fellow West Virginians without homes, to the onslaught of violence plaguing our nation and global citizens; I felt the need to share a little love. We are facing uncertainty and with that comes fear, it was time for me to take to the streets and get out into my community to give a little love in the form of Free Hug Friday.

My friends Alexandra Gallo and Julie Warden along with Mary Mo (from Cali here to help with flood efforts) and Stacy Kay, spent an hour walking around Charleston’s Downtown giving free hugs. If you have not given a stranger a hug, try it out. The smiles, the warmth, the joy and understanding it created filled the dark spots that were looming. We can get through all of this together if we approach each task, no matter how daunting, with a full heart and understanding.

Words from your hippie wonk,
Tara Martinez

Join Us for the First Evening of the 2016 Summer Policy Institute

The Inaugural 2016 Summer Policy Institute (SPI) will be held July 29-31, 2016 at West Virginia Wesleyan College in Buckhannon.

Students from across West Virginia will be a part of this first-ever event.

The first evening of 2016 Summer Policy Institute is free and open to the public! Plan to join us on July 29 at the Virginia Thomas Center for the Performing Arts!

6:30PM: Panel discussion – Moving to an Intervention and Prevention Model for Better Youth Outcomes. Panelists include Stephanie Bond with the Division of Juvenile Services; Eli Baumwell with the WV chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union; Kathy Szafran, President and CEO of Crittenton Services; Cindy Largent-Hill with the WV Supreme Court; Trudi Blaylock with PSI-Med; and Jason Nicholas with the WV Public Defenders’ office (invited: WV DHHR). The panel will be moderated by Circuit Court Judge Joanna Tabit. The panel will discuss how West Virginia can move more toward an intervention and prevention model instead of an institutional model when dealing with adverse youth experiences.

9:00PM: Screening of the film Paper Tigers, an intimate look into the lives of selected students at Lincoln High School, an alternative school that specializes in educating traumatized youth. Set amidst the rural community of Walla Walla, WV, the film intimately examines the inspiring promise of Trauma Informed Communities, a movement that is showing great promise in healing youth struggling with the dark legacy of Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACES).

Email info@wvpolicy.org for more information!


The Racial Wealth Divide

Please join Martinsburg Renew and Friends for a friendly, peaceful and open discussion on racial inequality in West Virginia, what it is, why it matters, and what we can do about it.

St. Joseph’s Catholic Church, Lackey Hall
July 28 2016, 6:00 to 8:30 p.m.
225 S. Queen Street, Martinsburg, WV

Contact Debbie at 540-535-5145, or DeborahMM@aol.com to register.

Free and open to ALL – Let’s start the discussion. Come, Learn, Understand, Share, Unite